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Leather Bicycle Handlebar Bag - Large
Leather Bicycle Handlebar Bag - Large
Leather Bicycle Handlebar Bag - Large
Leather Bicycle Handlebar Bag - Large
Leather Bicycle Handlebar Bag - Large
Leather Bicycle Handlebar Bag - Large
Leather Bicycle Handlebar Bag - Large
Leather Bicycle Handlebar Bag - Large

Leather Bicycle Handlebar Bag - Large

Regular price $150.00 Sale

Add a nice finishing touch to your bike with this beautiful, all hand-stitched and durable leather handlebar bag. All hardware is nickel-plated brass and is attached using strong rivets. The closure cord is black nylon parachute cord. Leather is 5 ounces thick, very durable, and water resistant. The bag's unique closure design keeps your valuables dry and secure while looking great!Easily attaches to handlebars with 2 buckled straps (3/4 in. x 8 in. spaced 5 1/4 in apart center-to-center).

Features
All hardware is nickel-plated brass and is attached using strong rivets. 
The closure cord is black nylon parachute cord. 
Leather is 5 ounces thick, very durable, and water resistant. 
The top of the bag has a handle making it easy to detach the bag from the bike and carry it with you.
Easily attaches to handlebars with 2 buckled straps (3/4 in. x 8 in. spaced 5 1/4 in apart center-to-center).

8 inches wide x 6 inches tall x 5 inches deep.

Leather craftsman, Jeff Amrhein, is based in Portland, Oregon. Several years ago he sat on a tiny stool in a small leather shop in the Marrakesh souq, watching as a craftsman sewed a large leather cushion. As he followed his hands rapidly moving back forth, needles flashing, he happily explained everything he was doing. He kept offering Jeff glasses of tea and Jeff kept watching and listening – utterly fascinated. When, several hours later, Jeff finally looked at the tray full of empty tea glasses, he realized that he was hooked before he even started working with leather.That began a gradual learning process. Over the next few years as Jeff was wandering around North Africa, Asia and the Middle East, fully a third of his backpack was stuffed with leather scraps, tools and powdered dyes. He continued to seek out local artisans, learning from anyone who was willing to share. He did leather work in all of his spare time, eventually replacing his camera pack with an ever-evolving series of leather bags. When he returned home to OR, his travels ended but his passion for leather craft remained. Little did he know back then, in Marrakesh, sitting on that stool, that today he would be doing leather work full-time, making a living doing what he loves.